Column #44

Hen and Chicks

Kate
Photo by Rick Bennett. Taken to publicize a chicken coop tour in Raleigh, North Carolina that raised $5000 and 2000 pounds of non-perishable food for Urban Ministries, which provides medical care and food for people in need. For more information, see hensidethebeltline.blogspot.com

 


Kate
Hen 'n Chicks block. Photo by Wisconsin quilter Jen Buettner.

 



Kate
Photo by Kelly MacDonald.

Not long ago, I wrote about the Shoo Fly quilt pattern, having been inspired by the Shoo Fly plant. I was recently given a start of a different plant, a succulent called Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum tectorum), and that got me thinking about quilt patterns of the same (or similar) name.

Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns lists several patterns that fall into this category, and shows sources for most of them dating from the 1930s (although one comes from an 1896 Ladies Art Company catalogue) Hen and Chicks, Hen ‘n Chicks, Hen and Chickens, Hens and Chickens, or The Hen and Her Chicks—all refer to quilt block patterns that feature a central geometric shape, usually a square, surrounded by smaller shapes, often triangles.

My Hen and Chicks plant also features a central cluster of rosettes (the “hen”) surrounded by smaller rosettes (the “chicks”). Descriptions of the Hen and Chicks plant say that European peasants planted the succulent on the thatched roofs of their homes in order to create a natural firebreak. Since Hen and Chicks retains water in its leaves, it would catch fire less quickly than the dried thatch.

If you’ve ever seen a mother hen surrounded by her baby chicks, you know that it is an easy visual leap to see where both the plant and the quilt pattern got their names. The large chicken in the middle of her brood of little ones is a memorable sight. Being a “chickenista” with a small backyard flock of my own, I can certainly understand how chickens’ appearance and their funny, endearing antics might give rise to all sorts of creative thought.

Of course, as is true with most traditional quilt patterns, the inspiration for a name may vary from place to place and from time to time. Barbara Brackman quotes Florence Peto as saying, “It is not wise to be didactic about the nomenclature of quilt patterns.” In one instance, Brackman notes that a pattern named Hen and Chicks is also called Shoo Fly.

Our quilting forebears took their cues from their surroundings and their everyday lives. Since many of them lived in a rural environment, it is hardly surprising that something so common and familiar as poultry would make its way into their artistic expressions.

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Archived blogs:

Column 112: The Family That Quilts Together, Stays Together
Column 111: Two Rivers, Three Sisters
Column 110: Quilters Helping Quilters
Column 109: Community Cookbooks and Fundraiser Quilts—Parallel Histories
Column 108: Quilting to Freedom
Column 107: National Quilting Day
Column 106: The Airing of the Quilts
Column 105: A Call for a National Juneteenth Commemorative Quilt
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Column 102: Helen Blackstone, A Texas Quilter
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Column 100: 100th Suzy's Fancy Column!
Column 99: Montana Stockgrowers Anniversary Brand Quilt
Column 98: The Tobacco Sack Connection
Column 97: Meet the Sisters Who Are State Fair Quilting Queens
Column 96: The connection between fairs and quilts.
Column 95: Her Mother Pieced Quilts
Column 94: Rebecca Barker’s Quiltscapes
Column 93: The Thread and Thimble Club Mystery
Column 92: The Ballerina Quilter
Column 91: Grandmother's Flower Garden Comes Alive at Texas Quilt Museum
Column 90: Leitmotif for a Lifelong Love Affair
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Column 88: Joan of Arc: A Quilter's Inspiration
Column 87: Home Demonstration Clubs and Quilting
Column 86: Linzi Upton and the Quilted Yurt
Column 85: A Bounty of Quilts
Column 84: Desert Trader
Column 83: Quilts and the Women’s Liberation Movement
Column 82: Replicating the Past: Reproduction Fabrics for Today’s Quilts
Column 81: Why So Many Quilt Shops in Bozeman, Montana?
Column 80: Southeastern Quilt and Textile Museum
Column 79: 54 Tons of Quilt
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Column 67: Righting Old Wrongs.
Column 66: 100 Years, 100 Quilts - More on the Arizona Centennial.
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Column 60: The Camo Quilt Project.
Column 59: Thread Wit
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Column 57: Preschool Quilters
Column 56: The Story Quilt
Column 55: Red and Green Quilts
Column 54: On the Trail
Column 53: Quilt Trail Gathering
Column 52: True Confessions: First Quilt
Column 51: Quilted Pages
Column 50: Doll Quilts
Column 49: More Than a Quilt Shop
Column 48: Las Colchas of the Texas-Mexico Border
Column 47: Literary Gifts
Column 46: A Different Way of Seeing
Column 45: Sampling
Column 44: Hen and Chicks
Column 43: A Star Studied Event
Column 42: Shoo Fly Pattern
Column 41: Awareness Quilts
Column 40: Tivaevae
Column 39: UnOILed UnspOILed Coast Quilt Project
Column 38: Katrina Recovery Quilts
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